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their work or given back to the environment through culture, through arts and through many of the hard work and we will unveil who will receive this dedication today. as many of you know trees are very important for our communities. they provide us shade, they deter water from going into our storm systems, they provide a place for birds and butterflies and of course they help us clean our air. arbor day is a very important event. it is celebrated not just in america, but all over the world and i'm honored that we are kicking this event. i would like to thank the mayor for bringing arbor day back to san francisco. this is our 8th arbor day. i will welcome mayor lee to the stage. >> thank you the dpw, the recreation department, to all of those who helped us in working today. arbor day, it is an annual celebration that we have struggled very hard to make sure this city appreciate because the trees are part of a great answer and solution to reducing carbon emissions and be sure we have greenery and beautification for our citizens. a lot of my friends celebrated chinese new years in china and th
. >> hank, you own bank stocks. are you not worried about this? >> no. in fact, in a rising rate environment, as long as rates don't spike up dramatically overnight, in a rising rate environment, banks are going to make more money. >> no, they're not. >> and become even stronger and healthier. and we own two of the highest quality banks in the world, jpmorgan and wells fargo. >> their customers can't -- the borrowers can't afford to pay the higher rates. what's going to happen to the value of the existing collateral when interest rates spike? eventually they're going to spike. the fed has waited far too long to raise them. when they rise they'll rise faster and higher than anyone believes. >> bob pisani, we're not really seeing the impact -- go ahead, jason. >> sure. injury. i'll add in here. i don't fully agree with what your guest is saying here as far as immediately rising rates and banks falling apart. having said that, i think the world has changed and we have to recognize the big picture here. number one, bank business models are not the same they used to be. they're not the great inve
of access to the humanities that urban environments provide, we have a better shot at than, say, other places where large distances have to be traversed in most american cities to kind of get to the places you want to get. here in san francisco, we have been blessed by the geometry where our trips are short where 40 years ago we realized that this was the way we will have to kind of meet our future. the iron call part of that is at the same time europe also discovered that and they made strides to towards actually implementing these alternative choices, we have found it very difficult to kind of wean ourselves from the convenience of being able to. i say it is still convenient to drive. as long as the alternatives are not just as convenient, we won't be able to make our case about our travel modes as contribution to the detriment of the environment or to the detriment of our health as we all know the sun is by date getting madder at us and angle grier at us and we are getting fat. we got to do something about it. this is the time to do it. we have the best opportunity here with these f
the environment and the puc is going to show everyone else, you can do this, too. and you can do it in a way that makes sense, that's affordable, and that is better for the environment. >> and this is the most energy efficient government building in the united states today, if not the world. and it is an example that the entire united states can look to and say, that's what we need to do to save our city hundreds of millions of dollars in energy consumption a year and set an example to everybody of how to save energy, to be green, to be sustainable, to be responsible. the city is leading the way. >> it will be immediately recognizable and iconic from various parts of the city or even if you see a picture. that's the sfpuc building. it's a wonderful building. ♪ ♪ >>> while i get myself settled, maybe a show of hands. how many already been to see the exhibition? a number of you. first of all let me say good afternoon and first and foremost i would like to thank my colleagues in the education department in the fine arts museum of san francisco for an allowing me to speak today. valuable a
for human and environmental health. lead addresses five categories that enhances environment. indoor air quality, energy, water, materials and resources, and sustainable sites are the five categories for the lead. you can go for several gold or platinum certifications. >> the city wanted to be silver lead status. . maybe gold was a stretch. and people said, if we're going to be a sustainable organization that the pucs this has got to be the top of the line. it's got to be a lead platinum building. what does that mean to us? we run water, power, and sewer. so, those are some of the biggest things involved in lead platinum. ♪ ♪ >> by late 2008 the project, as we got the contractor on board and we were able to start pricing it, we're a multi-, multi-, multi-million dollar over budget. >> the story a lot of people don't know after we got select today do this project, the first price we came in with was $180 million. and the city said, you know, this is a great building, but we just don't want to spend that much money. so, the project was on the verge of being canceled. >> if you're looki
universal experiences. the host creates a welcoming environment for everybody. there is no cultural barrier to entry. >> the demographic of people who come will match the demographic of the reader. it is very simple. if we want more people of color, you book more people of color. you want more women, your book more women. kind of like that. it gets mixed up a little bit. in general, we kind of have a core group of people who come every month. their ages and very. we definitely have some folks who are straight. >> the loyal audience has allowed michelle to take more chances with the monthly lineup. established authors bring in an older audience. younker authors bring in their friends from the community who might be bringing in an older author. >> raider has provided a stage for more than 400 writers. it ranges from fiction to academics stories to academic stories this service the underground of queer fell, history, or culture. >> and there are so many different literary circles in san francisco. i have been programming this reading series for nine years. and i still have a huge list on my co
to what's happening in our immediately environment and what we can see around us and what literally touches us physically. if you're walking through the woods and you hear the crack of a stick behind you, your body immediately goes into a fear response, a fight or flight response. climate change isn't that kind of a problem. it's not an immediate, visceral threat. and i can say right now, this very day, we can look out the window and there's co2, carbon dioxide, pouring out of tailpipes, pouring out of buildings, pouring out of smokestacks. and yet we can't see it, it's invisible. the fundamental causes of this global problem are invisible to us. and likewise the impacts are largely invisible to us as well unless you know where to look. so it's a problem that first of all we can't see. and secondly it's a problem that is seemingly faceless. it's not like terrorists who we can imagine who are coming after us trying to kill us and challenge our fundamental values. it's a problem that we can't see, that's going to have long term impacts that aren't going to just impact us now, but impa
through their dress and environments. like many photographs taken today 17th century portraits were taken from weddings. from 1625 him and his wife are exceptional examples of large scale marriage portraits. other typical occasions for commissioning portraits were births. capture the innocence of a beloved child. one of rembrandt's pupil. we see why he became a painter. the child's face reveal his own mature vocabulary. for those who have seen the exhibition it's exhibited next to rembrandt's work and you can see the two side by side. from this period, who was most famous for his self portraits. at the time, the paintings, is a copy of the original tradition of rembrandt. here you see the two paintings together which makes a subtle variations evident. the angle of the head and more controlled and refined manner of the brush work and copy on the left suggest that these paintings are probably not by the same hand. we now have scientific evidence which further suggest that the morris picture is a studio copy perhaps by the talented artist gart who is rembrandt's first people. you may remem
that was set and the environment was set up by the teachers. and so, in a sense, there was thoughtful planning put into what's going to be happening in the classroom, but at the same time, there's an openness about what the kids are interested in, what they're doing, that will allow you to focus in on their interests. at this point in time, i thought this was an interesting idea. so i started asking them some questions about what's going on, what they're doing, so as to get a sense of what they're thinking about initially so that we could talk about what the other teachers in the classroom-- where to go from this point. child: i'm seeing all of the colors. you're seeing all of the colors in the ocean. see that? i see there. where? show me again. where? i see green and red. you see green and red? me, too. do you see brown? no. hendrick: of course, no matter which techniques you decide to use, inevitably you will encounter some parents or family members who think you aren't doing enough fast enough, who want to accelerate the pace of their child's cognitive learning. woman: oh, let's see. let's
, what do you think? >> we have gone pretty far, pretty fast. in an interest rate environment. look at it from a relative basis, so that the equity market is pretty interesting place to be. we really haven't seen for a while. lou: we will get some indications on the housing market, we will look at building permits primarily, what are you expecting? >> still think the housing market is in pretty good shape, but if you look at the opportunity out there, seeing some places the housing market is doing pretty well, seeing a lot of the excess capacity in the marketplace, in a zero interest environment, a fair amount of the capacity, investment classes come in and actually bought up a fair amount of those equities. are we going back to the old days, absolutely not. lou: sean matthews, good to have you with us. now to the weekend talks office where "oz" continued to dominate, the prequel to "the wizard of oz." easily taken the number one spt for the second weekend in a row. warner bros. failed to live up to the title debuting at $10.3 million. nielsen will relate sunday ratings tomorrow. y
grew up in many an environment -- in an environment where we did tend to look to the west for support or help, but i have a lot of friends who grew up on the other side of the divide who don't see the u.s. the way my friends or my family do. but inevitably, america's a superpower, and it comes with sharp elbows sometimes and big motorcades and big fortresses as embassies. and that can be a bit grating on the local population. so it was really interesting or perhaps, um, revealing for me to be on the other side all of a sudden. it's just a totally different prism through which to look at the issue, to look at the eshoo, the to look at my own country. and i arrived, you know, i'm in the convoy, and i'm sitting there in the convoy and just a few cars ahead of me is another car in that same motorcade surrounded by security escort. this is the secretary of state, and there is jeffrey feldman, um, who is now assistant secretary of state at the state department who used to be ambassador to beirut, and it was his convoy that used to annoy people in beirut, that used to annoy me when i was stu
: the security environment surrounding this country is different than four years ago when you entered this academy. it has become increasingly severe with japan's air, sea, and land facing provocation. >> abe told graduates that during an emergency they're entrusted with the responsibility to protect the lives and property of the japanese people. he urged them not to hesitate and to take on all tasks no matter how harsh they may be. he says japan will increase expenditures for the first time in 11 years. he'll improve capabilities of the south defense forces. >>> norea has been threatening to launch a nuclear attack on the u.s. and now the country has washed that japan is also a target. the north has been criticizing japan for reenforcing the sanctions it's imposed against the country. the ruling korean workers newspaper issued a story. the security council resolution imposed additional sanctions on north korea for conducting its third nuclear test. the commentary warns that if the u.s. lights the fuse of a nuclear war japan will not be spared. north korea says it used a smaller, ligh
here. we are not simply here to hold their hand. we want a friendly environment for them. this is the kind of place we want them to feel it's open to consider new ideas but my job is to take them and give them some of those new ideas but challenge them to think in new ways they haven't before. >> host: can you predict who would be successful and who wouldn't? >> guest: at first, no because most of the students that we get are going to be successful so that's the good news but the first meeting, know it's impossible to determine who will be successful than others. >> host: what are the downfalls? >> guest: there are lots and lots of distractions here or at any other universities that is currently the biggest downfall which isn't paying attention to what they need to do. so not going to class, not getting assignments done, that is the most important thing in terms of making sure they have the best opportunity to succeed. >> host: what is the most common question students ask? >> guest: what's going to be on the test and that isn't the right question to be asking. what they
specific stance, it's a wealth effect-type stance, it's a very low- interest-rate environment, and i think that investors feel that the only real value right now, the only real place to put their money, is stocks; and clearly the perception of value is to the upside, otherwise we wouldn't have closed on highs on friday. > ben, have a great trading day. thank you. > > my pleasure. thank you. carnival cruise lines faces at least four lawsuits, inlcuding a class-action suit, after thousands of passengers were adrift for five days aboard a disabled carnival cruise ship last month. since then, three more carnival cruise ships have reported operational problems to either online systems or their backups, all of which coincides with carnival scaling back projected earnings. four incidents aboard carnival cruise ships in little more than a month led sandra thompson to cross carnival off her list for her next trip. "originally, i considered carnival because it was the least expensive; but after all this, i decided it's worth the extra money, and so royal carribbean is what i'm looking at now." carni
advertisementing environment and sf travel really helped convene this whole effort to come up with environmentally friendly alternative. there is a big press release coming out soon about triple a's efforts to provide new materials for outdoor advertising. sf travel really a great organization and they really understand that small business helps make san francisco a unique place to come. and supporting the neighborhoods and trying to promote the neighborhoods through their newly revamped visitor's center at the powell street station. near holiday plaza. they did a beautiful job. the architectural makeover and they are some great info graphics there and volunteers who are helping tourists and locals alike to find out more about the city. >> i would also like to add to that, sf travel is going to be introducing a new part of their website, which will be great for our commercial corridors. which is that they would like the merchants associations to create itineraries, and they will be linking our itineraries for our different neighborhoods onto their website and they are creating a whole new section
. ♪ chevron has been developing energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ...it's my job to look after it. the words are going this way-there's no way. oh, the lights came on. isn't technology supposed to make life easier? at chase we're pioneering innovations that make banking simple. deposit a check with a photo. pay someone with an email. and bank seamlessly with our award-winning mobile app. take a step forward... and chase what matters. >>> some patchy low clouds. mostly sunny in the morning. cooler by the coast. increasing high clouds later today leading to rain tomorrow. >>> all right, steve. 7:13. in indiana two people died, their private jet crashed into a house near the south bend regional airport. two other passengers and one other person on the ground was hurt. the plane was flying from tulsa when it hit three houses and got stuck in one of them. >> all
to tenants that it's worth paying more for a retrofit unit. we need all stake holders in the environment to receive that. >> thank you very much. next speaker? >> good afternoon supervisors, my name is michael wills. i'm an architect and earthquake safety group. i speak in favor of this program because it shows a common sense foresight to have an ordinance that offers and approach to strengthening, financing and a sensitivity to keeping people in their homes. after seeing and working with the details on patrick's committee, i think the city can be proud of this ordinance. it's one that has been drafted with care to all the concerns and not only of the technical seismic committee, technical and seismic professionals, but to the real sense itivity and keeping people in their homes and bringing the financial along with it shows that this is a program that will take care to make sure that all have access to the things that we all wants which is to make a safer, more residue resilient city. so i strongly urge this. >> thank you very much. next speaker. >> good afternoon supervisors, my name
energy here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪ ♪ hello. hello? the words are going this way-there's no way. oh, the lights came on. isn't technology supposed to make life easier? at chase we're pioneering innovations that make banking simple. deposit a check with a photo. pay someone with an email. and bank seamlessly with our award-winning mobile app. take a step forward... and chase what matters. >>> some patchy low clouds. mostly sunny in the morning. cooler by the coast. increasing high clouds later today leading to rain tomorrow. >>> all right, steve. 7:13. in indiana two people died, their private jet crashed into a house near the south bend regional airport. two other passengers and one other person on the ground was hurt. the plane was flying from tulsa when it hit three houses and got stuck in one of them. >> all of a sudden, sputtering
been here longer. it's not the kind of environment that the achievers want to go into and stay in and it doesn't make teachers feel valued at all. i got in a little bit of trouble the other night because i was giving a speech in california. and i was lamenting the fact that the teachers don't get paid enough to it i said think about this. i said basketball players. now, why my husband is a former nba player. this is why i got in trouble at home to it i said basketball players get paid $12 million a year for troubling of all -- dribbling around. we should be 12 million to our highly effective teachers in the nation because they are determining the future of our nation. but we have a skewed culture where we don't actually respect and honor teachers for the incredible work that they do. we certainly don't pay them what they are worth. >> in australia they have 200 days of public schools. in china and india is 200 days of public school instruction. in the united states, why do you think in the united states it is only 180 days? which is drastic if you take between china and india i
of the outer fringe. very moisture-rich environment here offshore as we're looking at a weather system that is tapping into the subtropical jet stream. it sits to the south at about 30 degrees north from the equator. you can see how the stream coming up from the hawaiian islands. but this big low that we're seeing here is actually going to track up toward western washington. so what falls around the bay area is mainly going to be light to moderate rain we think during the day on tuesday. so you can see here as we head into the afternoon, you're starting to see some of the pockets of light to moderate rain moving into the bay area to the tuesday evening hours. we'll see if the world baseball classic may see a little bit of rain there. wednesday morning, this will probably be the one morning commute affected by the rain during the wednesday morning until about lunch time commute. and then by the afternoon, the showers start to shut done. moisture starts to clear out. and high pressure builds in. our temperatures are going to be warming up pretty quickly as we go through the second half o
healthy, but i did it. and i noticed him talking again and again about the environment. and how proud she was of his achievement in cleaning up the aerts and of the water. he said it and he was proud of it publicly, and yet on the tapes you have him grousing about it not once or twice, but constantly, identify and environmentalism with liberals saying that we have made a mistake. we shouldn't do this. and if i ever have a choice between jobs and the environment, i always go with jobs. don't ever forget it and fire people that say they should go for the environment. it is so hard to understand. on the one side but he said publicly in the state of the union address, not once but three times that i listened to, what you would want and you actually expect bill clinton it's not president obama to say. but privately he is grousing. do you see in the 50's a man that is at war with himself over what he believes? >> i can see that. one of the most interesting things following this thread of mixing and civil rights, i mentioned the trip to africa and 67, and that's where we met martin luther king,
. whether for me or others in lebanon. i grew up in an environment where we did tend to look to the west for support, or help. but i have a lot of friends who grew up on the other side of the divide who don't see the u.s. the way my friends or my family do. but inevitably america is a superpower and it comes with sharp elbows sometimes and big motorcades and big force tresses as embassies and that can be a bit -- grating on the local population. so it was interesting or perhaps revealing for me to be on the other side all of a sudden. it's just a totally different prism through which to look at my open country. so i'm sitting there in the cop vow, and just a few cars ahead of me is another car in the same motorcade surrounded by security escorts, and there is the secretary of state, and there is jeffrey feldman, who is now assistant secretary of state who used to be ambassador to beirut, and it was his convoy that used to annoy people in beirut. used to annoy me when is was stuck at an intersection waiting for him to drive through. and i think it's always worth remembering that you have
cartwright campaigned on the environment, corporate tax reform and openly embraced the president's health care reform. something his democratic rival voted against. cartwright won the democratic primary by double digits and went on to easily beat his republican challenger. joining me, congressman matt cartwright. also joining with us fellow freshman who we met a few weeks ago. we save the biography a little bit. indiana republican congressman luke messer, president of the republican freshman class. congressman cartwright, you are one of four presidents, i need to get that clear, right? have you guys decided how you serve? >> that's -- we have. the first year is going to be split. we have co-presidents the first year between me and a terrific congressman from san antonio, texas. joaquin castro. we'll be co-presidents the first year. the second year will be michelle luhan gresham from new mexico. and a terrific congressman from maryland, john delaney. >> who we met just last week here. congressman cartwright i want to start with you. i know you guys had a bipartisan meeting last week with b
here for decades. we need to protect their environment. we have a strict quarantine system to protect the integrity of the environment. forty years on, it's still a class-a nature reserve. it's our job to look after them. ...it's my job to look after it. ♪
're not alone. with the dow having its best run in 16 years. >> starting from an environment where people thought the u.s. economy was really just done forever, we've now had a wonderful bull market appear out of nowhere. >> reporter: and all those nest eggs? the recession shrunk the average 401(k) from a high of just over $67,000 in 2007, to just over $46,000 in 2009. but that average has rebounded to more than $77,000 in 2012. experts say that everyday americans, like the wolters, got it right, leaving their 401(k) intact, riding out the market swing. as painful as that can be. would you suggest that people just not pay attention to that number every day? >> absolutely not. for a 10-year, 20-year 401(k), stay in the market long-term, you should be fine. >> reporter: bianna golodryga, abc news, new york. >> our thanks to bianna. >>> there's much more ahead on "world news" this sunday evening. a major development, a clue that might explain why that jumbo jet vanished in the atlantic. what we've now learned about the pilot. >>> and then, later this evening, the mystery washing up along the
with the changing health care environment -- consistent and focus on cpmc benefits to san francisco's most vulnerable. we believe this development agreement does meet these principles ~ and has continued to do that through a similar agreement you heard today on health care. first and foremost, two [speaker not understood] hospitals st. luke's campus and at cathedral hill. a continuation of the baseline level of care for 30,000 vulnerable san franciscans. hospital care for 5400 new medi-cal managed care beneficiaries. $9 million innovation fund managed by the san francisco foundation along with the department of public health as well as with cpmc. and this will provide primary care network for tenderloin. this is going to allow for one of the clinics in the tenderloin to really step up to be able to provide more for medi-cal managed care patients. through our work with the san francisco clinic consortium. we also will provide dollars for the expansion of mental health services for the community. and there will be other community based services that our community agencies can apply to for th
in the classroom, but an enriching learning and play environment that inspires them every day. thank you very much. and i'd now like to introduce an inspiring leader and a partner from our school principal, tammy [speaker not understood]. >> supervisor mar and the san francisco board of supervisors, [speaker not understood] argon elementary, it is a tremendous honor to accept your commendation. the vision of creating outdoor learning spaces, our staff's commitment to project-based learning, along with the city's generous support of our school made these projects possible. visiting argon elementary, you discover that our students are not only learning within the classroom setting, but they are connecting and applying new learning outside the classroom in our gardens, and with the mural design process. math measurement lessons begin to make sense when students discuss volume and length when creating and caring for container gardens, with new beet and chard seedling. they are moved to write poetry as they use all five senses as they experience their garden spaces. studying the life cycle of local ins
and on the community coalition and on traffic and environment. cathedral hill neighbors has been involved in the planning of this new project since 2005 and with the coalition since 2009, we have spoken many, many times about our desire to have two state-of-the-art hospitals, both sustainable and both reasonably size and scope, not a megahospital at cathedral hill and nonsustainable one at st. luke's. i think this framework that we're seeing today is a tremendous victory. thank you so much to the team on the board that worked on this and for the city staff and for cpmc as well. i do want to say that i learned a lot about traffic during this time. spoke to a lot of traffic engineers. my favorite meeting this time last year when we were talking about the 28,000 additional day trips, trips to go to cathedral hill hospital as planned and the traffic engineer explained to all of us, remember [speaker not understood] in detail, as to how this would not cause any additional gridlock in any intersections around cathedral hill or the tenderloin because everything would be permanently gridlocked. s
and the reason that will happen is because the cbd will create an environment where the merchants and land owners can look towards what the correct balance of tenants should be. rather than who is the highest bidder. >> and as we talk about saturation, saturation of night clubs, i also think as someone who advocates for night clubs, maybe we should look at saturation of residents because i think in places like south of market that would be the better way to look at the history. and my final thing in my long list of unsaid thing will be that the entertainment liaison and the police department... >> if you could wrap up. >> the entertainment liaison at the police department was created seven years after the entertainment commission was created. and so it is just been a recent phenomena. >> thank you. >> we are happy that it is working. >> thank you. >> next speaker? >> is there any other member of the public who would like to speak. >> seeing none, public comment is closed. >> president chiu? >> i want to thank you for your involvement in this hearing and i want to just make a couple of points, fir
. the department of transportation, explosive devices take place, some indicators in environment, are you looking for any type of unattended packages or boxes in high risk areas, liquids, mist -- this is going to be a biological or chemical release. numerous sick or dead animals or birds. any objects that does not seem right, do you want to touch it? i'm not sure what this is, let me jostle it around. no, no, don't do that. move away and report it. remember that. a cell phone, a call, calling 911, using your cell phone may detonate that device. so obviously don't use your cell phone. go to a hard wire phone, land line phone, outside, and call 911. what do we do as first responders. when we come up do we use our walkie talkies or radio? no. you go to a hard wire phone, call it in and get the information back because it may detonate that using the radio frequency. remember we talked about suspected terrorism is a stop sign for you as nerts. you do not want to get hurt. any questions on the terrorism? bnice is not nice. incident takes place, it takes place here on the left side, this is called the h
will make the environment better. we had approximately 1,000 overflows occur in 1999. today, we've reduced overflows by 45% to 50%. and it's going to continue to improve as we go forward with the rehabilitation program that's required under the consent decree. narrator: an important piece of the program is the construction of an 8-mile-long storage tank that will significantly decrease combined sewer overflows. man: right now, we're at the bottom of the rockdale construction shaft. we're 310 feet below grade, deep under atlanta in hard rock. in the downtown area of atlanta, the sewer system and the stormwater system are combined and there are overflows during storm events, and so the purpose of this system is to relieve that flow, take it into the tunnel, transport it to a brand-new treatment plant, clean up the chattahoochee river. narrator: instead of the combined sewage overflowing into the river, it will flow into this tunnel that acts as a storage tank. the water will then slowly empty into the new plant for treatment before it's released back into the river. man: the system in total
to stormwater infrastructure to transport water away from the urban environment. one approach was to carry waste and stormwater through the same pipe. this combined system was less expensive than building two individual pipe networks. and stormwater was seen as a way to flush out the sewers. through the 19th century, the combined system was considered state-of-the-art throughout the world, and is still in use in many cities today. but cities constructed these systems before treatment was the standard. and even today's largest treatment plant doesn't have the capacity to treat the sudden volumes of water rushing through a combined system during rain. the plant is overloaded, and the excess rainwater, mixed with untreated raw sewage, is diverted straight into local waterways, creating a combined sewer overflow, or cso. there are over 700 communities in the united states with combined sewer systems. the other approach was to separate wastewater from stormwater, using two pipe networks. this separate system simply carries the stormwater away from the city. but even separate systems pollute the water
to reduce the infrastructure's impact upon the environment. on the front lines of protecting the beaches, are the crews that clean out the stormwater system. man: this big vactor truck works on the same principle as your vacuum cleaner in your house, only this thing sucks up the whole house. some of the storm drains collect a lot of trash. i started cleaning drains in '93. they were horrible because they hadn't been maintained so much. now this is a priority. you have trash, animal waste, and it ends up on our beaches. that is a health risk. that is one of the main reasons why we have to close the beaches after heavy rain. narrator: but even when it's not raining, water still enters the stormwater system, carrying pollutants. here on the west coast, a lot of our storm drain systems are separate from the sanitary sewer system, so if you dump something in the storm drain, it goes right to the ocean untreated. alamillo: we haven't had a major rainstorm in the last year or so yet there's a lot of water in this creek here. i would say 20% of it is natural and the other 80% is runoff. shapiro:
of controlling the economy in this kind of a very volatile inflationary environment that had appeared in 1979. and so, the change was to go to strict targeting on the money supply alone. the effect of that is, if you're not paying any attention to the price of money -- which is what interest rates are -- the effect of targeting entirely on the supply is that the price of money is going to change a good deal more. schoumacher: by the end of the year, interest rates began to rise, and rise dramatically. by february, the prime rate had reached a record 20%. among the first to feel the squeeze were small businessmen. we understand what the objective of the national government is, what the objective of the fed is, but we think that what can be a cure for the country's ills can be fatal to the small businessman. schoumacher: the carter administration reacted to the sky-high rates by imposing a limit on the amount of credit banks could offer. suddenly, the buying spree ended, and the fed was pulled off-course. they were forced to expand the money supply to rescue the plummeting economy. but in late
is stronger than we think, or is this just because the federal reserve has created an environment where there just are very few alternatives to owning u.s. stocks? >> i believe the reasons that the stock market has been pretty strong this year, and as you say, maria, been hitting new highs is that the u.s. private sector and the corporate sector in particular is in really good shape. the factors i would point to is here in the united states we have by global standards cheap and plentiful energy, both oil and natural gas, that we have innovation and productivity. the economy is currently producing at an all-time high level in terms of gdp. but with about four million, five million less people employed than before the recession. so the productivity and innovation in the u.s. economy have been very strong. >> so are you putting new money to work, then, jim? how are you allocating capital with all of this? >> i think the key point in equity is to have a plan, have a long-term allocation. you should be up to waiting u.s. equities. if not, you should be moving up. i think the preference for b
republicans, the republicans that cared about the environment and privacy are absolutely excluded and fearful of speaking up. >> hal: right. >> caller: and that is really the mind-control the thought-control police that people have to look at as the example of where we don't want to go. i think it's so critical. >> hal: i always find it very shocking when there's this belief on the right that the expression of someone else's rights that are in the constitution, in the bill of rights, the acting on those rights in your own way is somehow a violation of theirs simply because it differs with their religious beliefs or makes them feel icky. if i'm creeped out, i don't want them to make it legal, because then i have to explain it to my kid. and the kid is more hip than you are, and the kid is like it's okay with me. and then you have to have a conversation with what your belief system is. you used to not even have to talk about it. if somebody got pregnant that wasn't supposed to. you sent her off to her aunt and she became unpregnant. >> i think you are right. th
the environment. we don't have the kids on corner fifth of jack dan will itself. >> sewed by businesses and safe businesses, there is no violence here because this is legal but there used to be violence in places like this. violent crime is why america ended 90 years of alcohol prohibition. >> we created organized crime. it organize well before prohibition. >> john: here is the murder rate about 80 years ago, it rose when alcohol was banned and dropped when it was legal again. >> if we want to do away with drug laws and say let adults do what they do, we know statistically the drug usage numbers are going to skyrocket. >> john: but we don't know that. they would think drug abuse would be rampant. portugal did he criminalized all drugs and the number of abusers did not skyrocket. >> people talk about portugals a success, it's actually a blatant failure. >> john: we went to portugal. he is just wrong. this man is portugal's drug czar 15 years ago, hair win users shot up on the streets and instead of doing what we've done they tried something different. they decriminalized every drug. crack, heroin
. particularly on the issues that she knew a lot about, which in alaska, are energy and the environment. and so when i got back, after that, i decided i would write a story about her. i mean, i heard a little bit about her. you don't hear much about alaska politics down here, for heaven's sake. she had run against the incumbent governor, republican, had defeated in the primarily then won the election in 2006 which was not a good republican year, but alaska is a pretty republican state and she won. so there she was in 2007. so i came back. i interviewed a bunch of people by phone and talked to her twice. i interviewed her twice on the phone and wrote a piece for "the weekly standard" about sarah palin. it was the first piece written about her in the national magazine in the united states. i don't go around bragging that i discovered her. >> the reason i ask you about this is here's "the weekly standard" magazine. this is a recent issue. most weeks, how many pages? 36 or so. >> 36 or 40. >> when did you know that column might have had an impact, led eventually to john mccain choosing her as vice
continues to be the case. i think that we're in a very low interest rate environment that continues to create this wealth effect and the money continues to go to the stock. >> got to leave it there, ben. thank you so much for your time today. >> thank you. >> want to show people quickly what's happening in gold and copper. copper is selling off. we talked briefly about china on the program, but the message should be it's not about a country of 1 million of 0.2% of zero gdp. it's about china and whether global growth jitters are coming back to the fore. with that in mind, we'll hand you over to "squawk box." thank you so much for tuning in. have a great day and hope to see you back here tomorrow.
of that there is no flight from bonds to stocks any time soon, we live in an inflationary environment, bonds return your principal. gerri: all right, thank you, you know what is interesting, i think tiny country, about a million people live there. cyprus, causing these ripples these concerns, tiny gdp . and yet one bank observer said this, if spanish and italian bank deposit irwake up tomorrow, and say they could tax my deposits too the potential for an international run on the banks is a high-risk. when people say things like that, this is someone who is an expert at banking. who actually does spend a fair bit of time studying these institutions, what should people be thinking about? maybe another option for investing ? >> behides savings, here in u.s. where you are not getting anything, we're -- like we get the question all of the time, it just, a good portfolio has a diverse set of assets whether it is commodities, real estate real , stock, international, and emerging or bonds it is properly allocated and risk managing of that portfolio, the buy and hole is not necessarily great for investors when in
, but looking at the action, right now suggests we're still in a fairly healthy environment. melissa: you are the first person i have heard say that today. even though we had a down day, shows a little bit of strength in the market because it wasn't even weaker based on this news? speak i think it could have been weaker, and a lot of my looking to buy the dip. two days of weakness. i'm not here to forecast what every wiggle in the market is going to be nor do we think investors should, but with part of your question is fed should investors get in, i am very fond of believing and saying get in or get out, that is gambling on a motive in time, should be a process over time. i do think there is a lot of underinvested investors in the equity on the fence looking for this. you get the money looking into by very quickly. melissa: you're both very fantastic, we really appreciate your time. melissa: here is the "money" question of the day, are you worried this could have been to other countries? you can follow me on twitter. all right, should you be going for the gold? many experts say the gold g
-chairs heard of the need for an environment of intellectual curiosity that encourages innovation. so, third, i want to hold hack-a-thons in tax-heavy cities like san francisco, austin, denver and new york to forge relationships with developers and stay on the cutting edge. fourth, once our new operation is up and running, we'll embark on a data and digital road show to demonstrate what campaigns and state parties can do to enhance their own operations. the report recommended getting early buy-in from all partners. fifth, we'll upgrade gop.com as a platform, redesigning it to better utilize social media and serve an increasingly mobile audience. sixth, we're going to be setting up an rnc field office in the san francisco area. as we learned with visits to the silicon valley and conversations with top tech firms, many of the best minds are on the other side of the country. having an office there will make it easier for technologynologists -- technologists to join in our efforts and serve as a hub for our data and digital political training. by doing all of this, we'll enter 2014 and 2016 with a
groups based in san francisco arguing that electric lights will endanger the environment and we'll have at least three lawyers running ads that say you can be killed by electricity. if someone tries to put electricity if n your house call us and we'll sue them for you. both parties are prisoners of the past. they are trapped in the ideas nd mind set. they they are all trapped in the age of candles. the first effort in electric light was 1800. in 189 thomas edson's laboratory had the first successful electric light. it lasted 13.5 hours. within a few months, edson hit and using carbonized bamboo the first practical light lasted 1,200 hours. this is the spirit we have lost. it seems determined to avoid thinking about it. edson said "we will make electricity so cheap that only the rich will burn candles." [laughter] [applause] i want to tell you that i've been trying to get the house of representatives to understand they can video v a hearing every week on the future and every committee and sub committee. they can be contrasting the burekic candle that are trapped with all the break throug
both, create a better environment for jobs but also live within our means. >> talk act reality, as well. you just heard it. no ratio of spending cuts to revenue increases republicans will accept. democrats will not cut or reform entitlements on their own. so there is no grand bargain to be had. >> it's the problem overall. one of the frustrations in washington is the fact you have on one hand the entitlement issue and you said democrats aren't going to move the direction without more tax revenue. on the other hand, you have republicans saying hey, if we're going to have tax reform we should reform it, get rid of the loopholes but put it into lowering rates to stimulate the economy. >> chris mathews, you made a point this week on a panel discussion saying you don't think the republicans are telling the whole story. they don't want to cut medicare or social security either. >> the problem is both sides are in positions they're happy to be in. that's why they all prefer sequestration to the next situation, which is if you're a republican, the democrats are basically saying -- i'm speaking
an environment where people thought the u.s. economy was done forever, we had a wonderful bull market appear out of no where. >> reporter: and all those nest eggs? the recession shung the average 401(k) from a high of $67,000 in 2007 to over $46,000 in 2009. but that average has rebounded to more than $77,000 in 2012. experts say that every day americans like the walters got it right. leaving their 401(k) intact riding out the market swings. as painful as that can be. would you suggest that people just not pay attention to the number every day? so many people do. >> absolutely not. for a 10, 20 year, 401(k). stay in the market long term. you should be fine. >>> at least two people have died after their plane crashed into a south bend, indiana neighborhood. the small jet was experiencing mechanical problems as it tried to land at the nearby airport. it hit two homes and then became stuck inside of a third house. investigators believe everyone on the ground, though, did survive. >> i was outside grilling on the grill. i looked up heard some engine noise. the plane was right over our house at that
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